How to make a great information product

 

how to make a great information product

It’s hard to live off your creativity. There are so many things that you take into consideration when you take the job as creator and decide to stick with it. Not only do you have to create – but you also have to convince people that you’re one of the best in the market of creating.

For me, it’s about creating products that need to stand out at first view. But these products also need to leave an experience of ‘great product’, so the good old viral effect and word-of-mouth sets in and the product starts to sell itself.

The key to a great information product is to be very aware of the benefits – and maybe not just listing them, but also communicate them extremely well – to different kinds of customers.

You shouldn’t only be looking at the product and how it’s build – it’s even more essential to look at the experience and outcome that your potential customers get by purchasing your product.

You need to focus more on how you want your potential customers to feel after they’ve tried your product.

How do you make sure your product is so great that it exceeds expectations?

Start by building an information product roadmap. A product roadmap you define what processes you want your potential customers to go through. Showing initiatives, processes and how you want your product to launch, communicate, and succeed. There you will also find your way through pitfalls and discussions.

Make the experience of the product and the outcome for the potential customer top priority.

Most of the time the key is how much value you can put into an information product. That’s all good and well, but in my experience one of the things that you also need to do is to keep thinking ‘customer experience’ and ‘outcome’. For example a lot of information products have a Facebook group where everybody who has purchased the product they meet up and connect afterwards.

Sometimes you, as an information product owner,  ask them if you can keep their email so you can send them new information when something new is coming up in the field.

There’s a lot of tricks to information products, but one of the things that has worked for me is to find  products that you can benchmark up against. How do they communicate? what do they promise? what are the outcome and how does the product exceed expectations? Why do people refer to them? Do they have an affilliate programme or something similar?

Enjoy building rockers!

rock on

 

Small products to support your brand

small products to support your brand

You should indulge sometimes when you continously build your brand online as well as offline. You should do small investments to support your brand. Things such as custom designed pencils and pens. Postcards. Envelopes.

Small products that surprises people.

Such as an old school  logoed letter seal (as seen above).

Such as custom made pencils:

gold pencils

Why? I believe, now, more than ever, that you need something analogue and real to support your (online) business and brand. I believe that everything needs to be anchored in the real world.  And luckily there are so many creative products you can choose to anchor.

I know it’s not to indulge to buy envelopes and postcards to support concepts – but I consider it a good investment to get a designer to set it up properly for you.

And one could argue if it’s to indulge, to send out postcards in envelopes all the time – just postage wise.

What do you like to spend your money on? when it comes to analogue items supporting your online business?

rock on

 

 

4 things to ask yourself to stand out from the rest of the pack

5 things to ask yourself

I’ve met some struggling women along my path as a female entrepreneur.  Every time I get this motherly urge to tell them that everything is going to be alright . Because there are real struggles to make ends meet and to be an attractive asset to other businesses and entrepreneurs. My experience is that most of them need something extra. Something that can diversify them, and make them stand out. Here are some of the questions I ask myself over and over again, to keep my brand and my business going.

 1. What do you want to be known for?

You need to find out what’s important to you, as a person. If you’re an entrepreneur, there is a reason that you became one. Speak your truth. Focus on what’s important for you – and maybe not very urgent. Most of the time, what’s important tends to be way bigger than what’s urgent.

2. Can you have a strategic approach to yourself?

A hard thing in personal brand building – having a strategic focus – not just to your brand but to you as a person and the choices you make in your business and around your brand. You get that by questioning the things you do to achieve the things you want. You get that by aligning yourself (or your goals) to whatever your heart desires to work with and around.

3. What do you do?

Get specific here, it’s where you get to find out how you spend your time. I sometime struggle with writing because there’s a huge amount of friendly gossip over on social media that I want to read. I think I could use my whole workdays being on social media if I don’t watch out. There’s a bunch of apps out that will make you realise how you use your time. I use a free Firefox extension called ‘Leechblock’ where I can block different websites for periods of time in the browser (which is where most of my procrastination happens.

4. Why do you do what you do?

Have you sometimes asked yourself, why that, if you want to build a successful business blog you end up writing newsletters? I am one of those types who tends to spread myself too thin on doing too many things at once. And I am proud to say I am becoming a master of finishing things before I start new ones.

 

rock on

 

 

5 rockin’ pieces of advice to build your personal brand strategy

 

personal brand strategy

Do you have a personal brand strategy? If not, get going, cause you need to think strategically about your personal brand – here’s some tips of mine to start off:

Base your brand on who you are now, and not only what you want to be.

You have to start somewhere. One thing that defines us in the business world is our titles, which to a lot of people means what you have achieved. If you don’t know who you are right now – ask around. List 20 people who’s degree of knowledge around you are different from one another and ask them how they see you and why. Then take action from there and create your brand day by day, word by word, shout by shout and message by message.

What can’t you shut up about?

When I started out there was one thing I knew for sure around my brand. I could keep talking and come with ideas around entrepreneurship and people starting to think action in as a part of their business – and how to use social media to amplify it a gazillion times.

Focus on the taglines

Even though logos are important, taglines are even more so, these days. You can keep mentioning them in a different context and create more content around them daily. You can even print them on t-shirts if that’s your thing.

Important IS urgent

Stephen Covey wrote in his book seven principles of highly successful people (one of my favorites) that you have to focus on the things that are ‘important-not-urgent’. When it comes to personal brand strategy, important IS urgent. You need to focus your brand on the larger pieces of content and concepts and what you want to be known for.

Don’t be that super proactive person (only) on social media

I see a lot of this these days. People are snapping, tweeting and IG’ing and updating social media all the time, but there’s no catches or hangers for people to find out more. One of the things that people mostly say about me is that they found me on social media, but what really caught them and made them sign up was my content on my website – how I wrote. How helpful I chose to be.  What I initiated. You can dilute a brand by not thinking it from one end to the other.

rock on

Make your brand stand out: Speak in taglines

speak in taglines

What makes brands vulnerable?: Not have gone through the process of developing taglines.  Their inability to pave out in cement what they stand for. A huge part of working with your brand is to get these things developed.

Your brand lives inside people’s head, and it might mean something else than you imagine.

Your taglines can help direct the brand, so you have some control of what you stand for, being inside of people’s heads and all. r. It’s a way for people to get to know you better, and it’s a way for your brand not to be indifferent or simply not stand out from the competitors because you’re too ‘vanilla.’

What are great taglines?

Great taglines are sentences that add a sudden kind of ‘oommpff’ to a brand. It’s what differentiates. Depending on what industry you’re in, your taglines could be world-revolutionary. They could also be an off-spin of ‘having the customer in focus’ (which a lot of companies uses as a tagline, but it’s a given in the contemporary business world). It depends on your industry and how you want to position yourself. I would love to have a business world where more people spoke in taglines. It’s short, sweet, and it makes a whole lot of difference in your personal business world.

 

rock on

 

How to develop a hashtag strategy

how to develop a hashtag strategy

Have you ever thought about adding a hashtag strategy to your digital marketing plan?

A hashtag strategy is where you’re mapping down the hashtags you’re going to use for your content on social media. You have to ask yourself if you’re going to use hashtags for measurement or community building (or maybe a bit of both).

So how do you develop a hashtag strategy?

There are several different layers to it. The first is to figure out what hashtags are the most used on a global level based on which social media is being used. Here you can see the most used hashtags on Instagram and Twitter (in my opinion the two places where hashtags are used best for brand building and community building).

After you’ve printed these hashtags in your mind, it’s time to get closer, especially if your content is localised, and you’re not communicating in English on Instagram or Twitter. Try to have a look around on both Instagram and Twitter and see if there are any hashtags that are localised that people use? Localised can also be within a certain theme or subject. I have done a bunch of work for a record label lately (community building and digital strategic consulting). For a record label, some of the best hashtags aren’t #love #instagood or #tbt. Those hashtags known to be the biggest, but they should rather use hashtags such as #nowplaying and #listeningto that people use to find new music suggestions. So even though you know what hashtags are the biggest, they might not be  relevant for you and your brand.

You can also develop your own hashtags. It’s a great way for people to hook up with each other if they are at the same event, or if they are interested in certain topics. Even if n you want to create movements and get people to post images or tweets about certain discussions or on certain days. Hashtags are a fun way to engage, and a great method to build digital communities and have people connect offline at events as well.

When you’re done researching hashtags, and have created your own – you can always keep track of the impact they have on a service such as hashtracking.

All in all hashtags are a community builders game out there, but it’s such a creative thrill to work with them.

rock on

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why do we need disruptive trends?

why do we need disruptive trends

The business world is in dire need for diversification. Every brand has a need to stand out these days. Enter stage: disruptive trends. Think about what Patagonia has done with their ‘buy less’ strategy. Standing out has become one of the primary reasons for selling your products. If you’re good at spotting disruptive trends, you can get ahead of the competition. But if you’re great at implementing these trends you can hit a home run with your branding. You can save a gazillion dollars in marketing because you’ve already claimed the mind space of your clients and potential clients within that niche.

This means that businesses are becoming more creative and making more state-of-the-art/ cutting-edge products – in order to gain market share.

If you can define disruptive trends and show the business world what it will look like in 3 years there a good chance that you can get ahead of the game.

 

 

Add action to your personal mission statement

personal mission statement

You should create a personal mission statement, so you always know where you need to go, where your true north is.  My personal mission statement has become a way to adjust what I am doing and what choices I am making.

Another  important element is to start showing the world how you’re living your mission statement. Adding action and documenting those actions in pictures, blog posts, tweets, pins, snapchats, you name it. Documenting your journey is  something I refer to as “storyliving” – a word I have developed and a cornerstone of my branding work with my clients.

Actions and documenting those actions (the glossy word “storyliving”) when it comes to personal mission statements adds substance and trust to your brand. Suddenly you’re not only claiming you’re doing living your personal mission statement, you’re showing  the world around you how you’re true to yourself.

You’re not just sharing buzzwords and making your way to becoming an expert because of your brand. You’re consistently showing that you’re adding action upon action and that you mean what you say.

rock on

Current trends in disruptive brand building

current trends disruptive brand

I see the business world right now as a place that’s frantically looking for disruption. The “old school” disruptive brands such as Amazon and Facebook has managed the digital transition very well, but at some point they went from being idealistically based to being stakeholder and money based. I know they are not the companies that are the least disruptive (some companies are not even looking at disruptive brand practices yet).

A while back I wrote a comment for the Danish magazine Berlingske about living in a world with 800 million cover girls. Everyone can take a selfie.  Is It very glitzy and glam, right? And at the same time so exponentially hollow and not grounded. I can’t tell you how many times I have met people who want to talk about using social media to promote a not-relatable, guru-like brand. Mainly because the brands themselves, think they are better than the people to whom they are relating. I can’t begin to describe how many business plans and yearly reports I have seen the word “connect” and “relationship. Then when it comes to disrupting a brand by connection and creating relationships, businesses chicken out because they are afraid of losing value by being “among the crowd” and not sitting on their high horse.

Want to build a truly disruptive brand these days? Turn to the relatable and the nearness. See people eye to eye. The small things. The daily execution.  It might not look innovative on a day to day basis, but keep that course, put it in your communication and marketing plans, and you will be disruptive entire industries.

rock on

How to create a personal mission statement

how to create a personal mission statement

One of the pieces of advice I always come back to, when it comes to my client work is that I want them to “speak in manifestos”. When you work with complex messages, it is always beneficial to be able to go back to “oh that’s what we mean” – or “oh yeah that’s why we’re doing this”. Especially when you work in teams and across management levels. That’s why I always work with different cores and different manifestos with my clients: it simplifies messages and get’s everybody on the same level.

It has been important to me to have a personal mission statement that keeps on reminding me, why I am as I am and choose as I choose. Now, I don’t post my personal mission statement at home on my wall. It lingers in my journals ready for me to look at it and remind me at times where I forget it.

Steps to writing a personal mission statement

– Who inspires you and why?

The people who inspire you can change your perception of things.
I have always been amazed on how much influence the blogs I subscribe to; they have on my life. There’s some of them I have been following for more than ten years and some of them are new. Some of them, I have subscribed to for some time, unsubscribed, and then resubscribed again after some time. If you want to change parts of you, you have to change your input.
I am aware that what I read isn’t only links that are shared by my friends on Twitter, or by the blogs I follow, but it’s also defined by the books I read and the magazines. Without going into details, it’s just important that you know what the different “outlet’s” are giving you.

– Who do you want to be?

I am still at a place where I am just happy to breathe. I am happy that my health is going in the right direction. But I think someway along the way, I don’t want to let my illness define me.  I want to be a writer. I AM a writer. But I want to write more. I want to create more. I want to feel good. To me, it’s more important to ask who you want to be today, than who you want to be 30 years down the line. That’s also an important question to ask, but the world are sometimes a bit too goal-oriented to me.

When you have answered those questions – you’re well on your way to being able to draft a personal mission statement. It’s not an easy process, but if you map down all the important words that keep popping up in your head, you can quickly write something together that looks like a personal mission statement.

Here’s my personal mission statement:
“my mission is to change me for the better and share my process. I will do this with being a true, creative, unique and inspiring person.

I know it’s a bit “airy” but it has to be if my work, my health, and everything else in my life has to fit in there. I do create mission statements around ever “sub-area” such as “health” as well.

ps. My mission statement used to have a different tone to it. It used to be:

“my mission is to change the world for the better and share my process. I will do this with being a true, creative, unique and inspiring person.”

But believing that I change the world by changing myself, I changed it a while back. It became closer to the heart of me.

Get creating rockers!

rock on

 

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