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Branding Community content marketing Social media

How To Develop A Hashtag Strategy

how to develop a hashtag strategy

Have you ever thought about adding a hashtag strategy to your digital marketing plan?

A hashtag strategy is where you’re mapping down the hashtags you’re going to use for your content on social media. You have to ask yourself if you’re going to use hashtags for measurement or community building. It could be a bit of both.

So how do you develop a hashtag strategy?

There are several different layers to it. The first is to figure out what hashtags are the most used on social media on a global level. Here you can see the most used hashtags on Instagram and Twitter. In my opinion, these two places make hashtags best for brand building and community building.

After you’ve printed these hashtags in your mind, it’s time to get closer. Especially if your content is localized, and you’re not communicating in English on Instagram or Twitter. Try to check Instagram and Twitter and see if there are any hashtags that are localized that people use? Localized can also be within a certain theme or subject.

I have done a bunch of work for a record label lately (community building and digital strategic consulting). For a record label, some of the best hashtags aren’t #love #instagood or #tbt. Those hashtags are known to be the biggest. They should rather use hashtags such as #nowplaying and #listeningto that people use to find new music suggestions. So even though you know what hashtags are the biggest, they might not be relevant for you and your brand.

Create Your Own Hashtag

You can also develop your own hashtags. It’s a great way for people to hook up with each other if they are at the same event, or if they are interested in certain topics. Even if n you want to create movements and get people to post images or tweets about certain discussions or on certain days. Hashtags are a fun way to engage, and a great method to build digital communities and have people connect offline at events as well.

When you’re done researching hashtags and have created your own – you can always keep track of the impact they have on a service such as hashtracking.

All in all, hashtags are a community builders game out there, but it’s such a creative thrill to work with them.

rock on
Categories
Branding Business Unusual Trends

Why Do We Need Disruptive Trends?

The business world is in dire need of diversification. Every brand has a need to stand out these days. Enter stage: disruptive trends. Think about what Patagonia has done with their ‘buy less’ strategy. Standing out has become one of the primary reasons for selling your products. If you’re good at spotting disruptive trends, you can get ahead of the competition. But if you’re great at implementing these trends you can hit a home run with your branding. You can save a gazillion dollars in marketing because you’ve already claimed the mind space of your clients and potential clients within that niche.

This means that businesses are becoming more creative and making more state-of-the-art/ cutting-edge products – in order to gain market share.

If you can define disruptive trends and show the business world what it will look like in 3 years there a good chance that you can get ahead of the game.

Categories
Branding Identity + purpose

Add Action To Your Personal Mission Statement

personal mission statement

You should create a personal mission statement, so you always know where you need to go, where your true north is.  My personal mission statement has become a way to adjust what I am doing and what choices I am making.

Another important element is to start showing the world how you’re living your mission statement. Adding action and documenting those actions in pictures, blog posts, tweets, pins, Snapchat, you name it. Documenting your journey is something I refer to as “storyliving”. It’s a word I have developed and a cornerstone of my branding work with my clients.

Actions and documenting those actions (the glossy word “storyliving”) when it comes to personal mission statements adds substance and trust to your brand. Suddenly you’re not only claiming you’re doing living your personal mission statement, you’re showing the world around you how you’re true to yourself.

You’re not just sharing buzzwords and making your way to becoming an expert because of your brand. You’re consistently showing that you’re adding action upon action and that you mean what you say.

rock on

Categories
Branding

Current Trends In Disruptive Brand building

current trends disruptive brand

I see the business world right now as a place that’s frantically looking for disruption. The “old school” disruptive brands such as Amazon and Facebook has managed the digital transition very well, but at some point they went from being idealistically based to being stakeholder and money based. I know they are not the companies that are the least disruptive (some companies are not even looking at disruptive brand practices yet).

A while back I wrote a comment for the Danish magazine Berlingske about living in a world with 800 million cover girls. Everyone can take a selfie.  Is It very glitzy and glam, right? And at the same time so exponentially hollow and not grounded. I can’t tell you how many times I have met people who want to talk about using social media to promote a not-relatable, guru-like brand. Mainly because the brands themselves, think they are better than the people to whom they are relating. I can’t begin to describe how many business plans and yearly reports I have seen the word “connect” and “relationship. Then when it comes to disrupting a brand by connection and creating relationships, businesses chicken out because they are afraid of losing value by being “among the crowd” and not sitting on their high horse.

Want to build a truly disruptive brand these days? Turn to the relatable and the nearness. See people eye to eye. The small things. The daily execution.  It might not look innovative on a day to day basis, but keep that course, put it in your communication and marketing plans, and you will be disruptive entire industries.

rock on

Categories
Branding Identity + purpose

How to Create A Personal Mission Statement

how to create a personal mission statement

It has been important to me to have a personal mission statement that keeps on reminding me why I am who I am and why I choose what I choose. Now, I don’t post my personal mission statement at home on my wall. It lingers in my journals, ready for me to look at it, and remind me at times where I forget it.

One of the pieces of advice I always come back to when it comes to my client’s work is that I want them to “speak in manifestos”. When you work with complex messages, it is always beneficial to be able to go back to “oh that’s what we mean” or “oh yeah that’s why we’re doing this”. Especially when you work in teams and across management levels. That’s why I always work with different cores and different manifestos with my clients: it simplifies messages and get’s everybody on the same level.

Steps to writing a personal mission statement

Who inspires you and why?

The people who inspire you can change your perception of things.
I have always been amazed at how much influence the blogs I subscribe to have on my life. There are some of them I have been following for more than ten years and some of them are new. Some of them, I have subscribed to for some time, unsubscribed, and then resubscribed again after some time. If you want to change parts of you, you have to change your input.
I am aware that what I read isn’t only links that are shared by my friends on Twitter or by the blogs I follow, but it’s also defined by the books and magazines I read. Without going into details, it’s just important that you know what the different “outlets” are giving you.

Who do you want to be?

I am still at a place where I am happy just to breathe. I am happy that my health is going in the right direction. But I think someway along the way, I don’t want to let my illness define me.  I want to be a writer. I AM a writer. And I want to write more. I want to create more. I want to feel good. To me, it’s more important to ask who you want to be today, than who you want to be 30 years down the line. That’s also an important question to ask, but the world is sometimes a bit too goal-oriented to me.

When you have answered those questions, you’re well on your way to being able to draft a personal mission statement. It’s not an easy process, but if you map down all the important words that keep popping up in your head, you can quickly write something together that looks like a personal mission statement.

My Personal Mission Statement

Here’s my personal mission statement:
“My mission is to change me for the better and share my process. I will do this by being a true, creative, unique, and inspiring person.

I know it’s a bit “airy” but it has to be if my work, my health, and everything else in my life has to fit in there. I do create mission statements around ever “sub-area” such as “health” as well.

ps. My mission statement used to have a different tone to it. It used to be:

“My mission is to change the world for the better and share my process. I will do this by being a true, creative, unique, and inspiring person.”

But believing that I change the world by changing myself, I changed it a while back. It became closer to the heart of me.

Get creating rockers!

rock on
 
 

Categories
Branding Business Business Unusual Creativity Identity + purpose

Help Each Other’s Creativity

I want to propose something to you. Something radical. Something that could shift your brand purpose and how others view you. I want us to help each other’s creativity.

I want you to see every friend connection as a mutual pact. A pact where you not only sign up to see what’s going on in each other’s lives on social media but also to help each other’s creativity grow.

Help each other’s creativity

Where you help each other out.
In my perspective in my part of the pact, an online friend connection is just as genuine as offline. Where online is simply an extension to amplify offline.

Where we help each other out and not just click a “like” when your connection posts a picture.

I’m so blessed that I have a very creative network that launches things. They use blood, sweat, and tears to build something fantastic.

The smallest thing I can do is to share their work and their efforts.

I’ve started to honor those genuine friend connections and help them launch their babies that mean the world to them. Sometimes by referring their work to others or sharing their updates.

I see it as a way I can serve the world and some of the people closest to me.

I see it as brand activism and viral effect on an underground grassroots level, and that my friends, is one of the best things I know.

Categories
Branding Identity + purpose

Disruptive Thinking: Brand Development Before Money Gain

disruptive thinking brand development

I had a link came through this morning from one of my Facebook friends about a Swedish media exec who was clearly disrupting the media world with her thinking and how she implemented things in her organization (link is in Swedish though, sorry rockers!).

Disruptive thinking leads to disruptive actions, and disruptive actions change organizations.

I am a firm believer that unusualness and disruption by thought are the way to proceed. Especially since I have been preaching business unusual and disruptive thinking in my brand studio Toothless Tiger, and making it the blueprint of everything I have done.

Creativity and play are also key; life is supposed to be challenging and fun, right? Looking at a challenge from so far away (or up close) that the challenge changes right before your eyes. It makes markets appear where they usually don’t. Disruptive thinking leads to disruptive actions, and disruptive actions change organizations.

If you want to be a leader in your field then you need to put those ideas into action. All the more reason if you want to be someone that people look up to for doing things differently.

When I researched about Return on Involvement, I did an interview with the CEO of the Danish office of Innocent Drinks. He told me that he had started speaking at a bunch of logistic conferences. I was a bit puzzled by this. Why would he be speaking at logistic conferences? Because Innocent Drinks had taken a stand. They gathered fruits for their smoothies from around the world and they weren’t going to use planes to do that. It was against everything that Innocent Drinks stood for. So they decided to have a zero-plane policy. And nobody in the logistics industry thought that it was possible to do this. But it was. Hence, a logistic rockstar company emerged to inspire the logistical industry, who also with this bold move showed that they put purpose before profit. That their long-term brand development matters more than short-term monetary gain.

Categories
Branding

What Do You Want To Be When You Grow Up?

When I was a kid, I wanted to be a veterinarian. So badly, that I worked for a veterinarian for a week and then found out that I wasn’t going to be a veterinarian because I passed out a couple of times.

Then I wanted to be a rockstar. My vision was to be sitting on a couch and talking about rock-n-roll.  And I became an alternative kind of rockstar, because of henrietteweber.com. A business rock-n-roll chick/avantgardist who rocks brands and preaches rockbandism who is a brand in her own way.

Sometimes things change when we grow up a bit more. These days all I want is a smile from the rockstar in the mirror and a firm belief that “I rock”.

But what else do I dream about being, in my lifetime? We grow up a little every day, right? So how do I want every day to feel?  To me, it’s very much the same with brands. Branding happens by the minute. It happens from a core of dreams, whether they are business, style, idea, or entrepreneurial dreams. Growing up can be a statement. A silent revolution against what’s going on in the world.

But for me, I try to dress myself to match some of this:

colorblocking

Act like this:

thou shall not take shit

Be brave like this:

 

Malala Yousafzai

Feeling so happy being in a world where creativity can amount to this (and you can purchase it!):

kate spade clutch

And when I become more grown-up, I will be rocking this:

florence claridge

How about you? Do you know what you want to be when you grow up?

Categories
Branding

Is Purpose The Best Currency?

We do like cold hard facts right in the business world, right? More than branding. More than purpose. It’s so interesting that we have this urge to collect a lot of data to validate our actions. And just when the data is collected, we forget about it. We write a strategy about it and then put that strategy in a drawer.

I am very passionate about the environment, sustainability, and gender equality. Mostly, I’ve previously expressed this passion by giving a lot of my time to be one of the editors of the amazing-now-no-longer-live “Green Girls Global” blog.  In my writing and speaking gigs, this passion came as an outcry for people to try and put purpose before profit. And if that was completely not doable, they should at least level purpose and profit.

Back in November, a report came out from CDP where they tracked 500 companies for 3 years, and the results were remarkable: Companies planning for climate change are more profitable, have higher returns, and are more stable.

You can read the full report here. Via Co.EXIST

From a branding perspective, a report like this can move mountains for an individual company. Putting purpose before profit is a real action defining who you are as a brand. Even though it hasn’t been updated for a couple of years, I was a huge fan of Greenpeace’s guide to greener electronics. I thought it was an important initiative, especially mapping out what action electronics companies were doing to become greener and giving consumers a clearer view of how green their electronics are.

Purpose before profit works, my awesome business rockers! So get those awesome world-changing projects going, no matter what field or company you’re working for. The universe will be all woo-woo like and shall reward you for your efforts!

Categories
Branding Social media

Have You Defined Your Social Media Ethics?

social-media-ethics

Social media ethics is something that is left untouched by a lot of people on the internet. It’s really important and something we should have a conversation about. After all, it defines our behavior, how people see us, or if you’re into business talk: your personal brand. Ethics are not what you preach, but what you practice.

Here are some social media ethics that I think could make the world a better and more loving place if we all used them:

“Via”

I hate it when I have found something good and then somebody else links to it or shares it without mentioning where they got it. That’s why I always put in a “via” – the internet and the people on it love links – so spread the love!

Sharing pictures on blogs

If I use a picture on my blog – I mention where I got it. Social media ethics FTW! – spread the link love rockers!  Most people don’t mind that you’re using their stuff if you tell the world where you got it. Sometimes I find a drop-dead gorgeous picture, which I want to use in a presentation for a keynote.  If a picture is protected by copyright, I ask the person if it’s ok that I use it. Haven’t gotten a no yet on that account.

Discussions

Remember that what’s said on social media is often very black and white. You can’t be in between. Just keep that in mind when you discuss it. My all-time worst discussions are political discussions. There’s just no way to tell people to respect that some people have a different opinion than yours. On the internet, we speak in what I call our “ultimate truth”. Most times, these discussions are text-based so either you agree (and tell it to the world). Strongly disagree (and tell it to the world). But if you’re indifferent about something you often just browse on through the emails or news feeds. That’s why it comes out like ultimatums. Keep that in mind.

Invites

One of the things that really gets to me, is people who keep adding me to groups without me approving it. I know you can do that on Facebook, and there’s no way (yet) that you can block people from doing it (you can with “event invites”, apps and pages). To me, it seems like a hole in permission marketing that some people are using to their advantage. Adding people again and again to new groups, creates more bad than goodwill, in my opinion, so watch that invite button.

People who share their content everywhere

You know those people who share everything they create into groups just because they can? It reminds me of a link baiting scheme. Making the rounds when you need traffic for your website, or you have a particular call-to-action you want to push.  It is a big mistake to do this on a continuous basis. Especially if you’re not contributing to the group apart from doing your seeding each time you have something you need to “launch”.

I do it myself though, on my channels where people have actively signed up to hear what I have to say. But in my point of view, there’s a big difference between sharing on your social media “embassies” and then sharing stuff in groups where people haven’t signed up to get your… Well – should we say.. close-to-spam?  As a moderator of several groups on the internet, over-sharing is a problem. There’s a lot of discussions going on about whether or not it should be “allowed” if the content you’re sharing is of value to the people in the group.

I say nay. Not if it’s simply a part of a scheme. I think everybody owes to themselves to listen to their gut feeling whether or not they should be sharing their oh-so-valuable content. If it’s something you’re over the top about and you simply can’t resist because it’s that good – go for it!

I would love to give a shout-out to moderators of groups. Most of you are doing a great job. If you have people who are unhappy with you because you’re keeping a close eye on how much people share (or spam), no worries. Mention to them that you’re watching their back and making sure that people don’t see them as “that person” who continuously push their own content for other people to buy. You make sure they’re not crossing the fine line between “valuable input” and “spammer” in a matter of updates. Or the fine line from goodwill around your brand to bad will.

rock on henriette weber