How to create a personal mission statement

how to create a personal mission statement

One of the pieces of advice I always come back to, when it comes to my client work is that I want them to “speak in manifestos”. When you work with complex messages, it is always beneficial to be able to go back to “oh that’s what we mean” – or “oh yeah that’s why we’re doing this”. Especially when you work in teams and across management levels. That’s why I always work with different cores and different manifestos with my clients: it simplifies messages and get’s everybody on the same level.

It has been important to me to have a personal mission statement that keeps on reminding me, why I am as I am and choose as I choose. Now, I don’t post my personal mission statement at home on my wall. It lingers in my journals ready for me to look at it and remind me at times where I forget it.

Steps to writing a personal mission statement

– Who inspires you and why?

The people who inspire you can change your perception of things.
I have always been amazed on how much influence the blogs I subscribe to; they have on my life. There’s some of them I have been following for more than ten years and some of them are new. Some of them, I have subscribed to for some time, unsubscribed, and then resubscribed again after some time. If you want to change parts of you, you have to change your input.
I am aware that what I read isn’t only links that are shared by my friends on Twitter, or by the blogs I follow, but it’s also defined by the books I read and the magazines. Without going into details, it’s just important that you know what the different “outlet’s” are giving you.

– Who do you want to be?

I am still at a place where I am just happy to breathe. I am happy that my health is going in the right direction. But I think someway along the way, I don’t want to let my illness define me.  I want to be a writer. I AM a writer. But I want to write more. I want to create more. I want to feel good. To me, it’s more important to ask who you want to be today, than who you want to be 30 years down the line. That’s also an important question to ask, but the world are sometimes a bit too goal-oriented to me.

When you have answered those questions – you’re well on your way to being able to draft a personal mission statement. It’s not an easy process, but if you map down all the important words that keep popping up in your head, you can quickly write something together that looks like a personal mission statement.

Here’s my personal mission statement:
“my mission is to change me for the better and share my process. I will do this with being a true, creative, unique and inspiring person.

I know it’s a bit “airy” but it has to be if my work, my health, and everything else in my life has to fit in there. I do create mission statements around ever “sub-area” such as “health” as well.

ps. My mission statement used to have a different tone to it. It used to be:

“my mission is to change the world for the better and share my process. I will do this with being a true, creative, unique and inspiring person.”

But believing that I change the world by changing myself, I changed it a while back. It became closer to the heart of me.

Get creating rockers!

rock on

 

A link love manifesto – from my creative strategic curls to yours

I know that a lot of people are really happy euforic about my newsletter here on henrietteweber.com, when I send it out every 14 days I really try to do my very best. 2 weeks ago I wanted to try something new: to do a “photos only” newsletter. I know a lot of you newsletter professionals might shout at me very loudly now, but hey I tried it and it actually worked pretty well, and converted a bit more than usual.

Last week somebody who had received my newsletter decided to copy the concept, into her own newsletter, which makes me euforic, because I am always happy to inspire, but I was kinda puzzled that she hadn’t linked to my website at least or mentioned where she got her “inspiration” from. I asked her about it and she said that she didn’t think I would be suited for the targetgroup of her newsletter. Which is sad, because apperently my ideas where more than good enough for them. Anyway I don’t want to be bitchy about it so I decided to turn it into something like this instead: my personal link love manifesto for the whole internet to read:

Enhancing your identity and branding ? you need a manifesto

One of the things I have worked with as an entrepreneur over the years is manifestos. I think they are dead important, both to the people who sees them because they stand strong, but also for me to get my head around what it is that I actually think and feel about a given subject. I went back in the blog archives and I have done a lot of manifestos during the years i’ve been running this blog… (8 years… cough).

A manifesto is a great way of figuring out what you think is important around a given subject – or even when you should be finding out what kind of company you are. I haven’t done a Henriette Weber or a Toothless Tiger manifesto yet – but they are up in my head – I know what I want to do and what I don’t want to do. What I stand for and what I don’t stand for. And that’s the great thing about manifestos because it becomes natural to you in the process and then you look back at them and think “hey that’s pretty cool”. A manifesto needs to be a natural process so you end out with something that everybody in the manifesto process believes in and acts out and stands for. It can be a lot of work (especially in large teams – but I guarantee you it’s worth it). in fact it often becomes something more than a manifesto

But here are my published manifestos over the years:

Anyway there was the silent revolution manifesto that became a large part of my book “return on involvement” because the silent revolution defines the changes that is happening inside of people. This was written before the paradigm shift in media and I still feel the “yep” coming from inside of me when I read it…

There was the creativity undefined manifesto that summed up my creativity work with Dannie Jost for our lift07 workshop – it’s still stands and is still the core of most of my thoughts around creativity. The surroundings has changed a bit though.

Then there was the creativity 100 manifesto – 100 pieces of advice for getting more creative… which is still one of my most read blogposts today =) I really digg that manifesto, and can’t really believe I did that…

And then – there is the involvement manifesto. A sum up of danish book (in english) which had the succes criteria that one person would print and put up on their wall in their office.(you can still make it). That’s why it’s designed and great looking and not just text=)

When I read through this my mind is going “I better get going on that creativity book” – 2 manifestos on creativity ? yes it is something I care deeply about =)

The silent revolution manifesto

here it is. my silent revolution manifesto:

silent revolution manifesto

The silent revolution is a movement WITHIN people to cope with the everyday information overload due to consumerism and marketing.

Nowadays we get so much information that there is no way that we can cope with it.

Not convinced? take a look at your inbox, or television or kids. Add your rss feed and your personal network. Stir it up with the products the media wants you to buy. Add a little touch of whatever the society wants you to be like – and you are almost there

Every company in the world wants you as it’s target group. They customize and scale themselves across branches and media.

In the world of today (and tomorrow) you will always be pressured. Deal with it!

What we need now is the best tools to make more time available – and they are currently being developed and marketed.

As a PR person, by now I know, that the chances of getting through to your audience via mainstream media ( TV, Radio and newspapers) are almost nonexistant.
It’s deathexpensive too.
And it doesn’t succeed.

There is nothing new under the sun. Companies are desperate looking for growth, and still, everybody ( including your neighbor) wants to sell you something.

I know, you want to sell something too.

So what happens?

People start to make their own media, global mikro companies, freelance companies etc.

You can even start your own bank now.

Everything is possible.

Manifesto for technological common sense

I am Currently working on a crossborder cultural project with Jens-Christian aiming to promote common sense in technology. Putting a “right” and “wrong” to different actions one may take on the internet. SPAM would be wrong.

The difficulty here is maybe my own morality. I’m thinking “who am I to tell people how not the misuse other people ( or their inboxes or blogs)”

I think there is a use for this. It is going to make more people happy.

I am doing a manifesto for technological common sense. I have done quite many so far, this one is really hard – because, in its essense, its a very unmanageable issue.

this is not a religion – even though it is a ruleset. it is not a movement – even though it seeks supporters.

 

What do I want in a job manifesto

I am currently thinking about getting a daytime job again.  It made me wonder around some criteria for a possible job. If I should ever have a job again – what should it be like ? it made me create this small “what do I want in a job” manifesto:

– The job should include design, technology, creativity, blogging and marketing
– I am supposed to work in a team but I have my own responsibilities
– The communication level should be extremely good
– I should be send off to all the cool conferences
– The job should not be location based, meaning I should be able to do it from all over the world
– The company should keep me motivated at all time and praise me when I do something cool
– Dogs should be allowed in the office, if there is one.

I know these criterias are kind of high. Conclusion: I should stay self-employed and on the entrepreneur path. Go Toothless Tiger!